January 15, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 16-01-2018

Heads Up:

Report Cards go home Friday. They are already on the portal.

Parent/Teacher Conferences are February 7, 8, and 9. If you need a specific time, call the office and request it. Parents who are on the portal can go as of today and schedule your times. The sooner you do, the better your chances of getting the times you want.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “Snowflake Bentley.”

Reading Skill – Summarize

Readers should summarize passages of a selection as they read. By identifying the main ideas in this way, they will be able to distinguish essential and nonessential information. There may be many details that support a main idea. These make the writing more interesting and enjoyable, but it is not necessary to remember them all.

Reading Strategy – Evaluate

When readers set out to evaluate a text, they should be prepared to summarize the most important information. Once they understand the text, they will be able to make judgments about the information presented and identify the author’s purpose.

Vocabulary Words – technique, foolishness, inspire, evaporate, microscope, magnify, negatives, blizzard

Spelling: Compound words

fishbowl, lookout, backyard, desktop, campfire, overhead, waterproof, grandparent, railroad, snowstorm, loudspeaker, bookcase, bedroom, blindfold, newborn, bedspread, yourself, overdo, clothesline, undertake

Review Words – berries, dresses, arches

Challenge Words – eyesight, paperweight

Grammar – Irregular Verbs

• An irregular verb is a verb that does not add -ed to form the past tense.
• Some irregular verbs have special spellings when used with the helping verbs have, has, or had.

Helping Verbs

• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a statement.
• Have, has, had, is, are, am, was, were, and will are helping verbs.
• Is, are, am, was, and were can be used with a main verb ending in -ing. A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has already happened.
• Will is a helping verb used to show an action in the future.

Linking Verbs

• A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject to the rest of the sentence.
• Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the predicate.

Math:
Finishing a unit on multi-digit multiplication. Please make sure you check your student’s homework. Many students are not doing their homework, or doing it poorly. Your help with this would be greatly appreciated.
Rotations:
Social Studies: Utah Animals
Science: Animal reports

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

January 8, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 08-01-2018

Heads Up:

No school on Friday or Monday.

Tutoring: I am going to have to postpone tutoring till further notice due to health issues.

Parent Teacher Conferences will be February 7-9. Those of you on the portal, remember you my preschedule a time that works for you.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “Mystic Horse.”

Reading Skill – Sequence the order of events in a story.

Reading Strategy – Summarize what the author is telling his reader.

Vocabulary Words – patchwork, mysterious, responsibility, midst, loosened, amazement, sores

Spelling: Plural words

clams, mints, props, arches, dresses, parents, caves, glasses, hobbies, engines, couches, arrows, enemies, babies, ranches, patches, mistakes, berries, mosses, armies

Review Words – circus, germs, spice

Challenge Words – batteries, compasses

Grammar – Helping Verbs

• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a statement.
• Have, has, had, is, are, am, was, were, and will are helping verbs.
• Is, are, am, was, and were can be used with a main verb ending in -ing. A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has already happened.
• Will is a helping verb used to show an action in the future.

Linking Verbs

• A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject to the rest of the sentence.
• Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the predicate.

Math:

Wrapping up multi-digit multiplication and division. Nibbling at fractions and the metric system.

Science: Wrapping up animals and plants. Biomes should be finished. Will be starting our animal reports.
As always thanks for your support.

Connie Johnson

December 4, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 04-12-2017

Heads Up:

Science Fair is December 7.

Field trip to the Ogden Nature Center. December 14, leave at 8:30 and return at 11:30. Be sure to keep an eye on the weather and dress appropriately. No siblings.

December 21 is a half day. Winter break is December 22- January 2. School resumes on January 3. Please let me know if you are planning on pulling your student out earlier than December 21.

Info for the week:
Reading:

Story: My Brother Martin

Vocabulary: unfair, ancestors, numerous, segregation, unsuspecting, avoided, injustice

Reading Strategy: Evaluate

Readers can and should evaluate everything they read. They can evaluate the information in a text by asking themselves questions about the author’s purpose. For example, why has the author chosen to write about the subject in the way he did? What is the source of the author’s information? Is the author presenting facts or opinions?

Reading Skill: Author’s Purpose

Readers should ask themselves if the author is trying to entertain, inform, or persuade them. If a selection includes humor or suspense, the author’s purpose may be to entertain. If the author gives a lot of information about a topic, the purpose is probably to inform. An author whose purpose is mainly to persuade tries to get the reader to think or act a certain way. You will find word choice and text organization are also affected by the author’s purpose.

Spelling: Words with silent letters. Test Friday afternoon.

hour, lambs, knew, wrench, kneel, thumbs, honest, answer, honesty, plumber, honor, known, combs, wrapper, knives, doubt, knead, wriggle, heir, wrinkle

Review: curl, pear, shirt

Challenge: knuckles. wrestle

Grammar: New:

• A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has already happened.
• Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
• If a verb ends with e, drop the e and add -ed.
• If a verb ends with a consonant and y, change y to i and add -ed.
• If a verb ends with one vowel and one consonant, double the consonant and add -ed.
• A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to happen.
• To write about the future, use the special verb will.

Last Week:

• An action verb tells what the subject does or did.
• A verb in the present-tense tells what happens now.
• The present-tense must have subject-verb agreement. Add -s to most verbs if the subject is singular. Do not add -s if the subject is plural or I or you.
• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject is singular.
• Change y to i and add -es to verbs that end with a consonant and y.
• Do not add -s or -es to a present-tense verb when the subject is plural or I or you.
• Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a speaker’s exact words.
• Begin a quotation with a capital letter.
• Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the speaker’s exact words.

Math: Continuing with long division and multiplication.

Social Studies: Utah’s Biomes

Science: Classifying animals and plants

Heads up, students will be learning about rocks in January. They will need to bring in 6 random rocks to learn to classify. The best place to get them is to walk through a parking lot and pick them up. The rocks should not be all the same color or type. That defeats the purpose of classifying.

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

November 27, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 27-11-2017

Heads Up:

I will have a sub Wed., Nov. 29.

Science Fair is December 7. I still need judges if anyone is interested.

Field trip to the Ogden Nature Center. December 14, leave at 8:30 and return at 11:30. Looking for helpers, no siblings allowed, park rules.

December 21 is a half day. Winter break is December 22- January 2. School resumes on January 3.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Story: Roadrunner’s Dance

Vocabulary: interfere, awkward, proclaimed, agile, guardian, tottered

Reading Strategy: Evaluate

When evaluating a story, readers can ask themselves questions like: Why has the author included these details? Why has the author described the character this way? Why has the author used figurative language, humor, or suspense? By asking these questions, readers can increase their understanding and appreciation of the story and the author’s purpose for writing it.

Reading Skill: Author’s Purpose

Readers should ask themselves if the author is trying to entertain, inform, or persuade them. If a selection includes humor or suspense, the author’s purpose may be to entertain. If the author gives a lot of information about a topic, the purpose is probably to inform. An author whose purpose is mainly to persuade tries to get the reader to think or act a certain way. You will find word choice and text organization are also affected by the author’s purpose. Readers also need to respect the age, gender, and cultural traditions of the writer.

Spelling: More ‘r’ controlled vowel words (Test on Friday morning)

dirty, purse, birth, curl, curve, curb, person, shirt, worse, hurl, twirl, swirl, herb, turkey, turnip, purpose, blurred, sternly, serpent, pearl

Review: hear, spare, lair

Challenge: spurt, further

Grammar: We are learning about verbs.

• An action verb tells what the subject does or did.

• A verb in the present-tense tells what happens now.

• The present-tense must have subject-verb agreement. Add -s to most verbs if the subject is singular. Do not add -s if the subject is plural or I or you.

• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject is singular.

• Change y to i and add -es to verbs that end with a consonant and y.

• Do not add -s or -es to a present-tense verb when the subject is plural or I or you.

• Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a speaker’s exact words.

• Begin a quotation with a capital letter.

• Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the speaker’s exact words.

Math: Continuing long division and multi-digit multiplication. Dipping our toes into decimals!

Social Studies: Continuing with Utah Biomes, their plants and animals.

Science: Classification and constructing our last biome.

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

November 13, 2917

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 13-11-2017

Heads Up:

Tuesday, November 14, I will have a sub. Training!

Math Night is this Thursday. GAMES & PIZZA!

Next week we have full days of school Monday and Tuesday, Thanksgiving Break is Wednesday, Thursday & Friday.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Story: Dear Mr. Winston

Vocabulary: weekdays, cardboard, slithered, genuine, apologize, harmless, ambulance

Reading Strategy: Generate Questions

As readers read a selection, they can ask themselves questions to help them identify information that is not directly stated in the text. If they have a hard time thinking of questions, they can simply ask questions about certain details in the story. This will help them find the reason why the author has organized the story in a certain way. Such as: Why is the story written as if it were a journal entry? Why is the story told as if it were being written in letters to someone? Why did the author choose to write the story as if the reader were the main character?

Reading Skill: Making Inferences

Making inferences about something happening in a story can be very challenging for some readers, but it can help us understand the characters and the plot. Good readers use clues provided by the author in combination with their own experiences to help them understand what the author has not stated directly. For example, the author may provide only one character’s point of view. Sometimes the author may only provide you with what the character is saying and not their thoughts. When the author does this, it is up to the reader to infer (make a good guess) what the character is thinking or why they did what they did.

Spelling: Words with ‘r’ controlled vowels sounds.

gear, scare, fear, cheer, spare, hear, rear, stair, airfare, career, compare, spear, beard, area, appear, yearly, tear, lair. mere, snare

Review: fort, dart, worn

Challenge: sincere, staircase

Grammar:

Plural & Possessive Nouns, telling the difference

• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• Add -s to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an apostrophe.
• A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has something.
• Add an apostrophe (’) and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive.
• A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or has something.
• A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership.
• Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’) and -s to a singular noun.
• A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows ownership.
• To form the possessive of a plural that ends in s, add an apostrophe.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s, add an apostrophe and -s. A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.

Math: Two-digit by two digit multiplication & division with remainders.

Social Studies: Try to finish Utah Biomes, their plants and animals before the break.

Science: Classification of Utah plants and animals.

Thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

November 6, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 06-11-2017

Heads Up:

Tuesday, November 14, I will have a sub. Training!

Friday, November 10 is an early out.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Students have not been doing very well on their reading, grammar and spelling tests. We will be repeating a few of these tests to make sure they are catching on. Your help is appreciated. Please have them practice their spelling words at home.

Story: How Ben Franklin Stole Lightning

Vocabulary: hilarious, convinced, mischief, independence, handy, dizzy, whirlwind, nowadays

Reading Strategy: Generate Questions

As you read a biography, you can ask yourself questions to help you identify the kind of information being presented. If you have difficulty finding the answers, you can ask questions about the details the author included. The details will help you identify the reason the author chose to present the facts in the way he did.

Reading Skill: Problem and Solution

Authors of biographies organize their texts in different ways. By focusing on a particular trait, such as the ability of the person to identify problems and find solutions to them, a biographer can share important information about the person while keeping the biography brief.

Spelling: Beginning ‘r’ controlled vowel words

door, dart, fort, morning, carpet, ford, core, cord, spark, award, smart, charge, worn, argue, stormy, bore, guard, ward, warp, barnyard
Review: screech, shrimp, throat

Challenge: charcoal, forecast

Grammar: We will be working on parts of a sentence for the next few weeks. We are beginning with nouns.

New: Possessive Nouns

• A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or has something.
• A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership.
• Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’) and -s to a singular noun.
• A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows ownership.
• To form the possessive of a plural that ends in s, add an apostrophe.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s, add an apostrophe and -s. A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.

Last Week:

• Some nouns have special plural forms.
• A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.
• To determine whether the noun is singular or plural, look at the rest of the sentence.
• A singular noun names one person, place, or thing. Examples: teacher, city, dog.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing. Examples: teachers, cities, dogs.
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns..
• Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh, ch, or x.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y, change y to i and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
• A noun names a person, place, or thing.
• A common noun names any person, place, or thing. Examples: teacher city dog
• A common noun does not begin with a capital letter.
• A common noun does not name a particular person, place, or thing. These words are not common nouns: Mr. Smith, Chicago, and Spot.
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing. Examples: Ms. Brown, San Francisco, Atlantic Ocean.
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
• Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each important word begins with a capital letter. Examples: Statue of Liberty Boston Red Sox
• The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.
• Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each important word begins with a capital letter.
• The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.

Math: Multiplication story problems

Social Studies: Utah Biomes, their plants and animals

Science: Water Cycle Test. Begin studying Utah plants and animals.

Thanks for your support.

Connie Johnson

October 30, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 30-10-2017

Heads Up:

Halloween Party tomorrow. Remember the rules!

Picture retakes this Friday.

Please make sure your lunch account is up-to-date.

November 22, 23 & 24 Thanksgiving Break.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Story: Stealing Beauty

Vocabulary: temples, dynasties, heritage, preserved, overjoyed

Reading Strategy: Making inferences and analyzing

Readers should use what they already know about a topic, including any of their life experiences that relate to it, to make inferences. They can also use this prior knowledge to help them analyze what the author is saying about the topic.

Reading Skill: Determine fact or opinion

A fact is a statement that can be proved as true. Writers use facts when writing informational texts about various subjects. They may also use facts to support their opinions.

An opinion is a statement that tells what someone thinks or believes. Signal words and phrases such as ‘I think’, ‘I believe’, or ‘I feel’, may alert a reader to opinions. Strong adjectives that are likely to be expressions of the author’s feelings, such as ‘ugly’, ‘exciting’, ‘terrible’, or ‘scary’, are also clues that opinions are being stated.

Spelling: Words with beginning three consonant clusters.

shred, through, sprout, sprawl, split, throb, throat, shrink, screw, shrimp, screech, straighten, sprang, shriek, splashing, straps, strain, strand, script, thrill

Review: graph, brush, these

Challenge: threaten, strictly

Grammar: We will be working on parts of a sentence for the next few weeks. We are beginning with nouns.

New: Irregular Plural Nouns

• Some nouns have special plural forms.
• A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.
• To determine whether the noun is singular or plural, look at the rest of the sentence.

Last Week:

• A singular noun names one person, place, or thing. Examples: teacher, city, dog.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing. Examples: teachers, cities, dogs.
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns..
• Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh, ch, or x.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y, change y to i and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
• A noun names a person, place, or thing.
• A common noun names any person, place, or thing. Examples: teacher city dog
• A common noun does not begin with a capital letter.
• A common noun does not name a particular person, place, or thing. These words are not common nouns: Mr. Smith, Chicago, and Spot.
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing. Examples: Ms. Brown, San Francisco, Atlantic Ocean.
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
• Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each important word begins with a capital letter. Examples: Statue of Liberty Boston Red Sox
• The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.
• Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each important word begins with a capital letter.
• The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.

Math: We are continuing to build our multiplication skills.

Please check their homework.

Social Studies: Historical Utah – Its people & places.

Science: Water cycle

Thanks for your support.

Connie Johnson

October 23, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 23-10-2017

Heads Up:

Please make sure your lunch account is up-to-date.

This week is Red Ribbon Week. Papers went home last week. Check the web site if you are not sure what the dress for the day is.

No School October 27.

Halloween Party is Tuesday, October 31. Volunteers welcome!

Info for the week:

Story: Mighty Jackie, the Strike-out Queen

Vocabulary: legendary, muttered, gaped, snickering, insult, fluke, flinched

Reading Strategy: Make inferences and Analyze

Good readers of fiction analyze the traits, or special qualities, of the characters in the story. They make inferences about what the characters may have done
in the past and what they may do next. Good readers also make inferences about the setting, and how the character might act or think in that particular place.
Reading Skill: Author’s Purpose

Good readers should ask themselves if the author is trying to entertain, inform, or persuade. If a selection includes a lot of humor or exciting action, the author’s purpose is probably to entertain. If the author gives the reader a lot of facts, the purpose is to inform. An author who wants to persuade a reader uses language to get the reader to think a certain way. The author’s purpose influences the way the text is organized, the choice of words used, and even sentence structure.

Spelling: Our focus this week is on words with the ‘th’ ‘sh’ ‘wh’ and ‘ph’ sounds.
rush, northern, brush, shed, thanks, washer, photo, graph, whole, these, fifth, whisk, thirty, bother, shove, phrase, headphone. width, nowhere, whirl

Review: arch, ketchup, cheap

Challenge: theater, wherever

Grammar: Nouns

• A noun names a person, place, or thing.
• A common noun names any person, place, or thing. Examples: teacher city dog
• A common noun does not begin with a capital letter.
• A common noun does not name a particular person, place, or thing. These words are not common nouns: Mr. Smith, Chicago, Spot.
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing. Examples: Ms. Brown, San Francisco, Atlantic Ocean.
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
• Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each important word begins with a capital letter.

Examples: Statue of Liberty, Boston Red Sox

• The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.
• A singular noun names one person, place, or thing. Examples: teacher, city, dog.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing. Examples: teachers, cities, dogs.
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns.
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns.
• Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh, ch, or x.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y, change y to i and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.

Math: We are building up to harder multiplication!
We are going to continue to work on multiplying by 10, 100, and 1,000. We will also be using the area model to multiply two digit-numbers by two-digit numbers.

Please check their homework.

Social Studies: Geographic Utah and Ancient Lake Bonneville.

Science: Water cycle and the properties of water.

Thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

October 9, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 09-10-2017

Heads Up:

The weather is changing constantly, so do our recess conditions. Just check and make sure you student has a jacket in case it is needed. We have a few who aren’t bringing one when they should.

October 16, 17, and 18 are scheduled for Parent-Teacher Conferences. Slips went home Friday to make your own appointment online. Those who do not make their own appointment online will be scheduled through the office. Those slips should be coming home this week. I can’t start rescheduling till I have them all back.

Fall Break October 19 & 20.

No School October 27.

Halloween Party is Tuesday, October 31. Volunteers welcome!

Info for the week:

Story: The Raft (Staying with the same story.)

Vocabulary: disgusted, raft, scattered, cluttered, downstream, nuzzle

Reading Strategy: Make inferences

Good readers of fiction analyze the traits, or special qualities, of the characters in the story. The make inferences about what the characters may have done in the past and what they may do next. Good readers also make inferences about the setting and how the character might act or think in that particular place.

Reading Skill: Analyze character, setting & plot

Readers begin to analyze a character by noting how he or she is described by the author or other characters. Readers should pay attention to the character’s actions, as these will help to identify his or her traits. Readers might ask themselves such questions as ‘What kind of person would say these things?’ “Do I know people who act like this?’ Good readers revise their understanding of a character as they read the rest of the story.

Author’s choice of setting is very important to a story. The more specific or unusual the setting, the more closely tied to the plot and the character’s experiences will be to that setting. You can begin to analyze the setting by looking at any pictures the story might have. The pictures can help you identify the location.

Spelling: Our focus this week is on words with the ‘ch’ and ‘tch’ sound.

choose, kitchen, marching, touch, chatter, sketched, chant, chance, branch, hitch, ketchup, cheap, chopped, latch, chef, patch, snatch, arch, stretching, pitcher

Review: stove, goal, mows

Challenge: chemical, checkers

Grammar: Run-On Sentences (Compound, complex, and run-on sentences are giving the students fits, so we are slowing down a bit here.)

• A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that should be written separately.
The boy found the raft the raft floated down the river.
• You can correct a run-on sentence by separating two complete ideas into two sentences. Each sentence
should have a subject and a verb. The boy found the raft. The raft floated down the river.

Complex Sentences

• A conjunction joins words, groups of words, or sentences.
• Use and, but, or or to combine sentences.
• Some conjunctions tell where, when, why, how, or under what condition.
• A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a conjunction other than and, but, or or is called a complex sentence.
Simple & Compound Sentences
• A simple sentence contains one subject and one predicate. It contains one complete thought.
• Two simple sentences may be joined to form a compound sentence, which contains two subjects and two predicates. It contains two complete thoughts.
• A conjunction is used to combine the two sentences. And, but, and or are conjunctions.

Math: We are beginning a unit on multiplication. We start with area and perimeter, and then build on this to introduce the area model of multiplication for two-digit-by-two-digit numbers.

Properties of a square and a rectangle. How we can use these quadrilaterals to help us understand and solve problems.
Science: On to the water cycle!

History: Utah’s diverse biomes, their plants and animals.

As always, thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

October 2, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 02-10-2017

Heads Up:

Can you believe it’s already October!?!

Please make sure your lunch account is up-to-date.

Science test on weather this week. Watch for the study guide to come home.

October 16, 17, and 18 are scheduled for Parent-Teacher Conferences. Keep an eye out for the slips and get the them back to me as quickly as you can. I can’t start rescheduling till I have them all back.

Fall Break October 19 & 20.

No School October 27.

Halloween Party is Tuesday, October 31. Volunteers welcome!

I know this seems a little early (even to me), but costumes are on the shelves. The Halloween Parade will be the morning of Oct. 31 (9:00). It is a Monday. Students are to bring their costumes to school and dress here. No masks. No weapons (toy or otherwise). Face paint to be kept to a minimum. Our Halloween party will be that afternoon. As we get closer, I will provide more information, just wanted to put it out there.

Info for the week:

Story: The Raft

Vocabulary: disgusted, raft, scattered, cluttered, downstream, nuzzle

Reading Strategy: Make inferences

Good readers of fiction analyze the traits, or special qualities, of the characters in the story. The make inferences about what the characters may have done in the past and what they may do next. Good readers also make inferences about the setting and how the character might act or think in that particular place.

Reading Skill: Analyze character, setting & plot

Readers begin to analyze a character by noting how he or she is described by the author or other characters. Readers should pay attention to the character’s actions, as these will help to identify his or her traits. Readers might ask themselves such questions as ‘What kind of person would say these things?’ “Do I know people who act like this?’ Good readers revise their understanding of a character as they read the rest of the story.

Author’s choice of setting is very important to a story. The more specific or unusual the setting, the more closely tied to the plot and the character’s experiences will be to that setting. You can begin to analyze the setting by looking at any pictures the story might have. The pictures can help you identify the location.

Spelling: Our focus this week is on words with the long ‘o’ vowel sound.

goal, mole, stone, stove, chose, own, fold, flow, mold, toll, groan, stole, foam, mows, roasting, lower, sole, blown, bolt, quote

Review: kite, shy, climb

Challenge: coaster, motor

Grammar: Run-On Sentences

• A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that should be written separately.
The boy found the raft the raft floated down the river.
• You can correct a run-on sentence by separating two complete ideas into two sentences. Each sentence
should have a subject and a verb. The boy found the raft. The raft floated down the river.

Complex Sentences

• A conjunction joins words, groups of words, or sentences.
• Use and, but, or or to combine sentences.
• Some conjunctions tell where, when, why, how, or under what condition.
• A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a conjunction other than and, but, or or is called a complex sentence.
Simple & Compound Sentences
• A simple sentence contains one subject and one predicate. It contains one complete thought.
• Two simple sentences may be joined to form a compound sentence, which contains two subjects and two predicates. It contains two complete thoughts.
• A conjunction is used to combine the two sentences. And, but, and or are conjunctions.

Math: Wrapping up place value, rounding, adding multi-digit numbers, and subtracting multi-digit numbers. We will begin a unit on multiplication. We start with area and perimeter, and then build on this to introduce the area model of multiplication for two-digit-by-two-digit numbers.

Properties of a square, rectangle, trapezoid, parallelogram, & rhombus. How we can use these quadrilaterals to help us understand and solve problems.

Associative Property of Addition and Multiplication: You can change the grouping without changing the answer. This only works if all the operation signs are the same. (All addition or all multiplication) It does not work if the signs are mixed, and it does not work for subtraction and division. We change the groupings by moving the parentheses.

Commutative Property of Addition and Multiplication: You can change the order of the numbers without changing the answer. This only works if all the operation signs are the same. (All addition or all multiplication) It does not work if the signs are mixed, and it does not work for subtraction and division.

Order of Operations: Work what is in the parentheses first, then work left to right, work multiplication and division first, then add or subtract. Exponents are not in the 4th grade core. Later in the year, if the students have mastered the core I will introduce them.

(17 + 15) – 4 x 6 =

17 + 15 first because it is in parentheses,

then multiply 4 x 6,

last you subtract the sum of 17 + 15 from the product of 4 x 6.

Science: Weather Review & Test. We kind a jumped around since our reading passage was on deserts I decided it was a good time to learn about Utah’s desert biomes. So, we will finish weather this week, then learn about Utah’s wet lands.

History: Utah’s diverse biomes, their plants and animals.

As always, thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson