March 19, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 19-03-2018

Heads Up:

I will be out of the classroom March 26 – April 17. Mrs. Allen is scheduled to be my sub. I will miss the students and worry about them, but hopefully this will put me on the road to good health again!

4th Quarter begins today.

March 23 our food drive collection begins.

Spring Break March 30 – April 6. School resumes April 9. Be safe!

Cookie dough is expected to be delivered April 10.

Spring Party is April 12. Watch for more info as we get closer.

April 16 last book fair of the school year begins.

April 19 The Museum of Natural History is coming to our 4th grade!

April 25 is PTA Break the Rules Day, more info coming.

May 7 The Living Planet Aquarium water van is visiting us.

May 10 we will be going to “This is the Place State Park.”

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “Wild Horses.”

Reading Skill – Cause and Effect

When an author’s purpose is to explain how or why something happens, he describes causes and their effects. As you read a story, look for events that caused actions to happen. Look for words and phrases that signal cause and effect. Such words and phrases include, but are not limited to, are: because, since, due to, as a result, and therefore.

While thinking about cause and effect, it is sometimes easier to look for something that happened and ask “Why did that happen?” The why is the cause.

Reading Strategy – Monitor Comprehension (Do I understand?)

We should ask ourselves questions about the text as we read. If we make a mistake, go back and reread the passage, or read ahead to fix any mistakes in our understanding. We can also create pictures in our minds to help us ‘see’ what the author is saying. We can slow our reading down if we need to, or speed it up. We can stop, think, and paraphrase (put it in our own words) to make sure we understand something.

Vocabulary Words – descendants, sanctuary, glistening, threatened, coaxing, fragile, habitat

Spelling Words – Words with ‘el’ ending sounds.

uncle, turtle, total, pencil, oral, pebble, channel, local, paddle, pupil, symbol, medal, bubble, settle, vessel, bugle, pedal, special, ankle, docile

Review Words – barber, anchor, cheddar

Challenge Words – animal, snorkel

Grammar – Adjectives

• Use better to compare two people, places, or things.
• Use best to compare more than two.
• Use worse to compare two people, places, or things.
• Use worst to compare more than two.
• Do not use more, most, -er, or -est with better, best, worse, or worst.
• Add -er to most adjectives to compare two people, places, or things. COMPARATIVE
• Add -est to most adjectives to compare more than two. SUPERLATIVE

Math:

The majority of students did not do well on the end of fraction unit test. We will be redoing that this week. Those who did well will move on to Geometry.

Social Studies: Historical figures in Utah.

Science: Review for SAGE and learning about soil. soilnet.com is a great website!

As always thanks for your support. I know it seems crazy, but the end of the year is fast approaching!

Connie Johnson

March 5, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 05-03-2018

Heads Up:

This has been a one of those years for me and my health. I will be out most of March, Mrs. Allen will be my sub. I will be having surgery again, but should be back up to full speed after Spring Break. Thank you for your understanding and patience.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Because of the craziness of last week, we are a little behind. We will be finishing last week’s story and starting our new story tomorrow.
Our story is “Ranita, the Frog Princess.”

Reading Skill – Evaluate a Text

When a person is able to determine the main idea or events of an article or passage, they are better able to make judgments about the information presented, and identify the author’s purpose.

Reading Strategy – Make Judgments

One way to evaluate a text is to make judgments about the characters and their actions. The way a playwright presents the characters in a play reflects the message he wants to get across. Students should think carefully about what each character says and does, then compare this to the way people act and speak in real life. Students should pay close attention to the words the characters use and ask themselves: What kind of person would say that?

Vocabulary Words – selfish, bumbling, cranky, commotion, exasperated, specialty, famished

Spelling Words – Words with open and closed first syllables. Open first syllables have a long vowel sound. The vowel is NOT followed by a consonant in the syllable. EXAMPLE: mu-sic. Closed first syllables have a short vowel sound. The vowel is followed by a consonant in the syllable. EXAMPLE: fin-ish.

river, level, never, talent, radar, limit, diver, finish, famous, spoken, cabin, wiper, habit, bison, cider, stolen, promise, razor, pity, easel
Review Words – swallow, plastic, rumbles

Challenge Words – sequence, vivid

Grammar – Adjectives

• The words a, an, and the are special adjectives called articles.
• Use a and an with singular nouns.
• Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound.
• Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound.
• Use the with singular nouns that name a particular person, place, or thing.
• Use the before all plural nouns.
• Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronouns. For example, adjectives may tell what a noun or pronoun looks, sounds, smells, tastes, or feels like.
• Adjectives may be placed before a noun or pronoun. Adjectives may come after the words a, an, and the.
• Adjectives may follow a linking verb.
• Use commas to separate three or more adjectives in a series.
• Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns.
• A proper adjective begins with a capital letter.
• Common adjectives are not formed from proper nouns.
Do not capitalize common adjectives.
• Do not use a comma to separate a single adjective from a noun.
• When only two adjectives are used together, separate them with a comma or and. Do not use both.
• Use commas to separate three or more adjectives in a series.
• When you are using only two adjectives before a noun, some adjectives do not need to be separated with commas. These adjectives describe color, size, or age: a woman with short gray hair.
• Do not use commas or and to separate a common adjective from a proper adjective: the hot Alabama summers.

Math:
Fractions and decimals.

Social Studies: Fossils in Utah.

Science: Wrapping up fossils!

As always thanks for your support. I know it seems crazy, but the end of the year is fast approaching!
Connie Johnson

February 26, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 26-02-2018

Heads Up:

Jr. Author Fair is March 1st. Watch for information to come home.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “At Home in the Coral Reef.” Finishing it.

Reading Skill – Contrast and Compare

Sometimes an author organizes a piece of nonfiction by comparing and contrasting two or more things, people, or ideas. In describing how they are alike (comparing) and different (contrasting), the author gives readers a framework for understanding a topic.

Reading Strategy – Analyze Text

If a reader can recognize the structure of a text, it will help them understand it better. Look for clues at the beginning of a text that will tell you what kind of structure the author has chosen. Being aware of the text structure will also help you determine what the author’s purpose is.

Vocabulary Words – coral, reef, partnership, current, eventually, brittle, suburbs

Spelling Words – Words that contain short vowel sounds with the VCCV pattern. (vowel-consonant-consonant-vowel)

dinner, blanket, willow, plastic, welcome, summer, dipper, foggy, thriller, ticket, swallow, picket, witness, slender, nodded, planner, member, fossil, rumbles, blossom

Review Words – talking, drawn, shawl

Challenge Words – cupboard, friendly

Grammar – Pronouns Students are not doing so well on this!

• A possessive pronoun takes the place of a possessive noun. It shows who or what owns something.
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my, your, his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns can stand alone (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs)
• Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive.
• Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
• Add an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of plural nouns that do not end in -s.
• Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
• A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add –s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he, she, and it.
• Do not add –s to an action verb in the present tense when you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word such as for, at, of, with, or to.
• Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
• Use a reflexive pronoun instead of an object pronoun if the subject of the sentence is doing the action to himself or herself.
• Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, themselves, and yourselves are reflexive pronouns.
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
• Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
• Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.

Math: Fractions

Social Studies: Fossils in Utah

Science: Rocks & Soil

As always thanks for your support.

Connie Johnson

February 20, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 20-02-2018

Heads Up:

I will have a sub February 22. I will be at the district science fair.

Jr. Author Fair is March 1st. Watch for information to come home.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “At Home in the Coral Reef.”

Reading Skill – Contrast and Compare

Sometimes an author organizes a piece of nonfiction by comparing and contrasting two or more things, people, or ideas. In describing how they are alike (comparing) and different (contrasting), the author gives readers a framework for understanding a topic.

Reading Strategy – Analyze Text

If a reader can recognize the structure of a text, it will help them understand it better. Look for clues at the beginning of a text that will tell you what kind of structure the author has chosen. Being aware of the text structure will also help you determine what the author’s purpose is.

Vocabulary Words – coral, reef, partnership, current, eventually, brittle, suburbs

Spelling Words – Words with aw, al, au, & ou.

walker, chalk, laws, stalk, bald, caught, drawn, halt, strawberry, fought, caller, half, straw, small, thought, talking, awe, shawl, false, squall

Review Words – south, pouch, annoy

Challenge Words – wallpaper, awkward

Grammar – Pronouns Students are not doing so well on this!

• A possessive pronoun takes the place of a possessive noun. It shows who or what owns something.
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my, your, his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns can stand alone (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs)
• Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive.
• Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
• Add an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of plural nouns that do not end in -s.
• Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
• A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add –s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he, she, and it.
• Do not add –s to an action verb in the present tense when you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word such as for, at, of, with, or to.
• Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
• Use a reflexive pronoun instead of an object pronoun if the subject of the sentence is doing the action to himself or herself.
• Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, themselves, and yourselves are reflexive pronouns.
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
• Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
• Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.

Math: Fractions

Social Studies: Rock formations in Utah

Science: Rocks & Soil

As always thanks for your support.

Connie Johnson

February 12, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 12-02-2018

Heads Up:

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching. We do not have a Valentine’s Day party. However, the students can bring a box or a bag for a Valentine exchange. I will give them the last half hour of the day to make the exchanges. We have 24 students currently in our class.

No school February 16 or 19.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “Adelina’s Whales.”

Reading Skill – Sequencing

Students can help themselves understand an informative article by identifying the sequence of events. First, next, last…

Reading Strategy – Analyze Text

Authors of nonfiction organize their articles in many different ways. The author helps readers to better understand the topic by presenting the information in particular ways.

Vocabulary Words – rumbling, snoring, unique, dove, massive, tangles, politicians

Spelling Words – Words that contain ‘oi’ ‘oy’ ‘ow’ and ‘ ou’

flower, voices, tower, mound, cowboy, grown, frown, south, howling, annoy, noises, pound, hound, pouch, thousand, wound, grouch, cough, grown, voyage

Review Words – cookie, zoom, huge

Challenge Words – drought, downtown

Grammar – Pronouns

• A possessive pronoun takes the place of a possessive noun. It shows who or what owns something.
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my, your, his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns can stand alone (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs)
• Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive.
• Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
• Add an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of plural nouns that do not end in -s.
• Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
• A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add –s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he, she, and it.
• Do not add –s to an action verb in the present tense when you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word such as for, at, of, with, or to.
• Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.

• Use a reflexive pronoun instead of an object pronoun if the subject of the sentence is doing the action to himself or herself.
• Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, themselves, and yourselves are reflexive pronouns.
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
• Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
• Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.

Math:

Fractions & Decimals

Social Studies: Utah Geography

Science: Rocks

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

February 5, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 05-02-2018

Heads Up:

Conferences this week! Notices of appointment times went home Friday. If you did not go on the portal and schedule your time, you have been given a time.

Wednesday, Thursday, & Friday are all early out days.

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching. We do not have a Valentine’s Day party. However, the students can bring a box or a bag for a Valentine exchange. I will give them the last half hour of the day to make the exchanges. We have 24 students currently in our class.

No school February 16 or 19.

Info for the week:

Reading:
Our story is “The Power of Oil.”

Reading Skill – Draw Conclusions

Drawing conclusions is thinking logically about clues the author includes in a text. These clues will help answer questions you may have and will help you make inferences about things the author may not have stated directly in the text.

Reading Strategy – Generate Questions

Students should make a habit of asking themselves questions before, during, and after reading. They should ask questions about what the characters say and do. They should also ask questions about what may have already happened and what might happen next. They should also ask questions about why the author included that information.

Vocabulary Words – electrical, glob, fuels, decayed

Spelling Words – Words with u sounds in their spelling.

should, zoom, tunes, brooks, you’ll, wool, mood, suits, crew, spool, stool, cookie, food, used, grew, group, stoop, move, stew, huge

Review Words – pennies, prettily, funnier

Challenge Words – crooked, juicy

Grammar – Pronouns

• A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add –s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he, she, and it.
• Do not add –s to an action verb in the present tense when you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word such as for, at, of, with, or to.
• Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
• Use a reflexive pronoun instead of an object pronoun if the subject of the sentence is doing the action to himself or herself.
• Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, themselves, and yourselves are reflexive pronouns.
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
• Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
• Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.

Math:
Working on fractions.

Social Studies: Utah Animals – Report

Science: Rock Cycle

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

January 29, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 29-01-2018

Heads Up:

Parent/Teacher Conferences are February 7, 8, and 9. If you need a specific time, call the office and request it. Parents who are on the portal can go as of today and schedule your times. The sooner you do, the better your chances of getting the times you want. The portal for scheduling will close this Wednesday.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “The Blind Hunter.”

Reading Skill – Draw Conclusions

Drawing conclusions is thinking logically about clues the author includes in a text. These clues will help answer questions you may have and will help you make inferences about things the author may not have stated directly in the text.

Reading Strategy – Generate Questions

Students should make a habit of asking themselves questions before, during, and after reading. They should ask questions about what the characters say and do. They should also ask questions about what may have already happened and what might happen next. They should also ask questions about why the author included that information.

Vocabulary Words – cautiously, faint, disguised, crisscrossed, wisdom, jealousy, fade

Spelling Words – Words with u sounds in their spelling.

should, zoom, tunes, brooks, you’ll, wool, mood, suits, crew, spool, stool, cookie, food, used, grew, group, stoop, move, stew, huge

Review Words – pennies, prettily, funnier

Challenge Words – crooked, juicy

Grammar – Pronouns

• A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add –s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he, she, and it.
• Do not add –s to an action verb in the present tense when you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word such as for, at, of, with, or to.
• Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
• Use a reflexive pronoun instead of an object pronoun if the subject of the sentence is doing the action to himself or herself.
• Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, themselves, and yourselves are reflexive pronouns.
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
• Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
• Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.

Math:
Working on fractions.

Social Studies: Utah Animals – Report

Science: Beginning Rock Cycle

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

January 15, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 16-01-2018

Heads Up:

Report Cards go home Friday. They are already on the portal.

Parent/Teacher Conferences are February 7, 8, and 9. If you need a specific time, call the office and request it. Parents who are on the portal can go as of today and schedule your times. The sooner you do, the better your chances of getting the times you want.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “Snowflake Bentley.”

Reading Skill – Summarize

Readers should summarize passages of a selection as they read. By identifying the main ideas in this way, they will be able to distinguish essential and nonessential information. There may be many details that support a main idea. These make the writing more interesting and enjoyable, but it is not necessary to remember them all.

Reading Strategy – Evaluate

When readers set out to evaluate a text, they should be prepared to summarize the most important information. Once they understand the text, they will be able to make judgments about the information presented and identify the author’s purpose.

Vocabulary Words – technique, foolishness, inspire, evaporate, microscope, magnify, negatives, blizzard

Spelling: Compound words

fishbowl, lookout, backyard, desktop, campfire, overhead, waterproof, grandparent, railroad, snowstorm, loudspeaker, bookcase, bedroom, blindfold, newborn, bedspread, yourself, overdo, clothesline, undertake

Review Words – berries, dresses, arches

Challenge Words – eyesight, paperweight

Grammar – Irregular Verbs

• An irregular verb is a verb that does not add -ed to form the past tense.
• Some irregular verbs have special spellings when used with the helping verbs have, has, or had.

Helping Verbs

• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a statement.
• Have, has, had, is, are, am, was, were, and will are helping verbs.
• Is, are, am, was, and were can be used with a main verb ending in -ing. A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has already happened.
• Will is a helping verb used to show an action in the future.

Linking Verbs

• A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject to the rest of the sentence.
• Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the predicate.

Math:
Finishing a unit on multi-digit multiplication. Please make sure you check your student’s homework. Many students are not doing their homework, or doing it poorly. Your help with this would be greatly appreciated.
Rotations:
Social Studies: Utah Animals
Science: Animal reports

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson

January 8, 2018

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 08-01-2018

Heads Up:

No school on Friday or Monday.

Tutoring: I am going to have to postpone tutoring till further notice due to health issues.

Parent Teacher Conferences will be February 7-9. Those of you on the portal, remember you my preschedule a time that works for you.

Info for the week:

Reading:

Our story is “Mystic Horse.”

Reading Skill – Sequence the order of events in a story.

Reading Strategy – Summarize what the author is telling his reader.

Vocabulary Words – patchwork, mysterious, responsibility, midst, loosened, amazement, sores

Spelling: Plural words

clams, mints, props, arches, dresses, parents, caves, glasses, hobbies, engines, couches, arrows, enemies, babies, ranches, patches, mistakes, berries, mosses, armies

Review Words – circus, germs, spice

Challenge Words – batteries, compasses

Grammar – Helping Verbs

• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a statement.
• Have, has, had, is, are, am, was, were, and will are helping verbs.
• Is, are, am, was, and were can be used with a main verb ending in -ing. A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has already happened.
• Will is a helping verb used to show an action in the future.

Linking Verbs

• A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject to the rest of the sentence.
• Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
• Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the predicate.

Math:

Wrapping up multi-digit multiplication and division. Nibbling at fractions and the metric system.

Science: Wrapping up animals and plants. Biomes should be finished. Will be starting our animal reports.
As always thanks for your support.

Connie Johnson

December 4, 2017

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Posted by cdjohnson | Posted in A little about me... | Posted on 04-12-2017

Heads Up:

Science Fair is December 7.

Field trip to the Ogden Nature Center. December 14, leave at 8:30 and return at 11:30. Be sure to keep an eye on the weather and dress appropriately. No siblings.

December 21 is a half day. Winter break is December 22- January 2. School resumes on January 3. Please let me know if you are planning on pulling your student out earlier than December 21.

Info for the week:
Reading:

Story: My Brother Martin

Vocabulary: unfair, ancestors, numerous, segregation, unsuspecting, avoided, injustice

Reading Strategy: Evaluate

Readers can and should evaluate everything they read. They can evaluate the information in a text by asking themselves questions about the author’s purpose. For example, why has the author chosen to write about the subject in the way he did? What is the source of the author’s information? Is the author presenting facts or opinions?

Reading Skill: Author’s Purpose

Readers should ask themselves if the author is trying to entertain, inform, or persuade them. If a selection includes humor or suspense, the author’s purpose may be to entertain. If the author gives a lot of information about a topic, the purpose is probably to inform. An author whose purpose is mainly to persuade tries to get the reader to think or act a certain way. You will find word choice and text organization are also affected by the author’s purpose.

Spelling: Words with silent letters. Test Friday afternoon.

hour, lambs, knew, wrench, kneel, thumbs, honest, answer, honesty, plumber, honor, known, combs, wrapper, knives, doubt, knead, wriggle, heir, wrinkle

Review: curl, pear, shirt

Challenge: knuckles. wrestle

Grammar: New:

• A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has already happened.
• Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
• If a verb ends with e, drop the e and add -ed.
• If a verb ends with a consonant and y, change y to i and add -ed.
• If a verb ends with one vowel and one consonant, double the consonant and add -ed.
• A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to happen.
• To write about the future, use the special verb will.

Last Week:

• An action verb tells what the subject does or did.
• A verb in the present-tense tells what happens now.
• The present-tense must have subject-verb agreement. Add -s to most verbs if the subject is singular. Do not add -s if the subject is plural or I or you.
• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject is singular.
• Change y to i and add -es to verbs that end with a consonant and y.
• Do not add -s or -es to a present-tense verb when the subject is plural or I or you.
• Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a speaker’s exact words.
• Begin a quotation with a capital letter.
• Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the speaker’s exact words.

Math: Continuing with long division and multiplication.

Social Studies: Utah’s Biomes

Science: Classifying animals and plants

Heads up, students will be learning about rocks in January. They will need to bring in 6 random rocks to learn to classify. The best place to get them is to walk through a parking lot and pick them up. The rocks should not be all the same color or type. That defeats the purpose of classifying.

As always thanks for your support.
Connie Johnson